World Languages

This course parallels the mainstream Writing and Literature 1 class, but provides extra support to ELLs.

ESOL American Literature is a skill building course for English Language Learners that explores different genres of literature written in the U.S. In this course, students practice reading, writing, listening, and speaking in order to get better acclimated to the American classroom and to begin producing essays in English. Students read two novels, and many short stories and poems. Discussion on topics touched upon in fiction and nonfiction texts and films is a focal point of the class, as is writing. This class helps prepare these students for the work of Writing and Literature.

What does it mean to survive and what does it mean to thrive? What does it mean to be a citizen of the world? This course tackles questions such as these while building a skill set including: observation, interpretation, developing research questions, paraphrasing, leading discussions, citing sources, thinking critically, determining the reliability of sources, making connections, recognizing patterns in history. This practical course incorporates a hands-on active curriculum where students help guide the curriculum based on their interests.

ESOL Language Arts develops students’ vocabulary and language skills in English through intensive reading and speaking practice, and explicit instruction in reading strategies, pronunciation, and writing, in order to effectively prepare students for English and Humanities courses at Darrow and beyond.

ESOL Environmental Science prepares students for mainstream science courses at Darrow while covering the subject of Environmental Science. Topics include: diversity of ecosystems, taxonomy of living organisms, species' survival and interaction, our New England environment, energy in the atmosphere, climate change, solutions to global warming, and sustainable living. Students practice research skills, ask questions, record observations, analyze and present data, and learn strategies for reading and responding to informational texts.

These year-long courses provide students with an opportunity to develop their Spanish language skills in classes that group students of similar proficiency levels. Instruction in these courses will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Students will be expected to contribute, to the best of their ability, to the maintenance of the classroom immersion environment. Proficiency in all major areas (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) will be developed through a variety of activities. Both individual and group work will be included. The teacher will provide classroom instruction, assign homework and administer assessments.

How are languages learned and used? How do they change? In this class, students explore these questions as well as the ties between language and one’s cultural and individual identity. Topics include first and second language acquisition, human language versus animal communication, bilingualism, language use, and the study of regional and social dialects, genderlects, and idiolects. There will be several short writing assignments and a final project. Students will also be asked to respond to readings and videos. We will use the Darrow community as a laboratory for research on topics of students’ choosing.

Open to 10th through 12th graders.

In this History course students will explore the dictatorship of Francisco Franco and the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War, in Spanish, through individual and group research, various readings, videos, and lectures. Students would be asked to write analytical papers, and to create research projects focused on their interest in each section studied. In this course students would have a variety of assessments ranging from reenactments, research based projects and presentations, and essays. Most assessment would be done in groups, however various projects and essays would be done individually.

In this History course students will explore the Spanish Civil War and rise of Francisco Franco, in Spanish, through individual and group research, various readings, videos, and lectures. Students would be asked to write analytical papers, and to create research projects focused on their interest in each section studied. In this course students would have a variety of assessments ranging from reenactments, research based projects and presentations, and essays. Most assessment would be done in groups, however various projects and essays would be done individually.

This semester-long course is designed for self-motivated students who want to start or continue on the road to foreign language proficiency--in a language other than Spanish. Students will be responsible for planning and maintaining their own course of study, and reflecting on their progress each week. They will use all the modern language learning tools at their disposal in order to attain proficiency in the language of their choice. The teacher’s role will be that of a coach or facilitator, providing resources and guiding students in their study while at the same time helping them to take ownership of the process.

Two semesters of this course will be required for English Learners to support the practice of English pronunciation, listening, reading, and/or writing skills. ELs who attend the Darrow English Immersion program in August before starting at Darrow will be exempted from one semester.

Students of this literature class will study literary periods, the lives of authors, explore poetry, short stories, and essays, critically analyze literary devices used by authors, compare and contrast different works, and compose their own works based on different themes in the readings. The first course of the literature sequence will focus on themes of early Hispanic literature before the introduction of contemporary 20th century literature. Assessment in this course will be composed mainly of essays in which the students use critical analysis to explain literary devices found in a reading, research the life of an artist in relation to a piece of work, or to compare and contrast reading within a similar theme. Students will also be asked to write original works utilizing a similar theme or literary device present in past readings.

Students of this literature class will study literary periods, the lives of authors, explore poetry, short stories, and essays, critically analyze literary devices used by authors, compare and contrast different works, and compose their own works based on different themes in the readings. The second course of the literature sequence will focus on themes of contemporary Hispanic-American literature of the 20th century. Assessment in this course will be composed mainly of essays in which the students use critical analysis to explain literary devices found in a reading, research the life of an artist in relation to a piece of work, or to compare and contrast reading within a similar theme. Students will also be asked to write original works utilizing a similar theme or literary device present in past readings.